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Editorial: The Pedalboard

In other news: my Pedaltrain 2 has arrived, along with my new Dunlop DVP-1 volume pedal. So, the pieces of my pedalboard are lying around. All that remains is to put it all together into a configuration. Other than the Pedaltrain and the power supply, the components are, in no particular order:

  • Korg DT-10 tuner
  • TC Electronic Spark Booster
  • MXR Phase 90 (block logo)
  • Dunlop Crybaby wah (limited edition white painted)
  • Dunlop DVP-1 volume pedal
  • TC Electronic Shaker Vibrato
  • MXR Carbon Copy analog delay

The vibrato and delay will go into the effects loop of the amp, the other five before the input. Cable cornucopia! The tuner will likely be connected to the tuner out of the volume pedal, unless I prefer the sound of its buffered input. More than that, I haven’t really figured out exactly in which order to put the pedals. The one thing I know is that I want to keep the phaser before the amp input, because I’ve yet to hear a phaser that sounds good after distortion. (Edit 16 March: accidentally wrote BEFORE distortion. Oops!) The vibrato does sound pretty cool before distortion, but the delay sure as hell doesn’t. Keep the regeneration and mix above 9 o’clock and it immediately turns to mush.

One thing that strikes me is that this pedalboard is not that different from what Hendrix would have used. That is entirely intentional. Listen back to those albums from 1967 and onwards, how the great players experimented with tones. Other than the really saturated modern metal tone, all the basic rock tones were already discovered before 1972. Before flangers, before choruses. In those days, there were Leslies, wahs and phasers, which are effects that simply feel more organic to me. Believe me, I have an incredible itch for a proper fuzz and a Uni-Vibe!

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Posted by on 15 March, 2014 in editorial, gear

 

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Review: Korg Pitchclip

The Joyo JT-12B demonstrated the basic validity of the clip-on tuner concept. But, as I pointed out in that review, that tuner is a little too versatile for its own good.

The Korg Pitchclip addresses all of those issues. This is the simplest device you could imagine. There is nothing to configure and consequently no wrong settings. It has one button, ON/OFF, and one pitch standard: 440 Hz. It shows two things: the note name and whether or not you’re in tune. The only feature available is that when you hold the on/off button down, the display is activated upside-down. This is actually more useful than I first imagined!

My only beef with the Pitchclip is that it only comes in funky neon colors. There is no black, so I selected the next best thing: a dark blue. But, as the guy told me when he sold it to me, at least no one is going to steal that pink Pitchclip from you!

On the whole, a simple but purposeful product that is wholeheartedly recommended!

 
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Posted by on 20 April, 2013 in gear, review

 

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