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Tuners

In retrospect, I find it absolutely fascinating that I managed to play the guitar for 14 years before I bought my first electronic tuner. How the hell did I do it? Well, for starters, most of the time I played by myself, so absolute pitch was definitely secondary to relative pitch. It was only when I started playing in bands that it came to close to being an issue. And even then, most of the time someone would hit the open E string and everyone else would tune from that. For more precision, I used reference tones. So long as we tuned to standard pitch, the dial tone on your average phone was a perfect reference: 440 Hz, or middle A. When we dropped down to D, I would either tune my B string to the phone, or put on Hangar 18 by Megadeth, which has a long intro, all on a D pedal tone. Then I would tune all the other strings after the top string and when I got to the rehearsal space, the other guys would tune after me. I didn’t get a tuner until I started Nox in 1999. I can’t even remember which make it was, but it was black and it didn’t like our E flat tuning, so back to the shop it went after the first rehearsal. Instead I got what I considered to be the gold standard, namely the Boss TU-12H. The Boss was not a bad tuner. It was accurate enough, and it worked with both electrics and acoustics. The problem was that whenever you plugged in an electric, the mike was invariably left on, so that it basically had to be all quiet in the room, or the darned thing wouldn’t do its job. If only I had been aware of the Boss TU-2 pedal tuner when we first started out, it would have saved me lots of grief! But I had committed to the TU-12H, I was too cheap to get a second tuner, and I didn’t want to go through the hassle of trying to sell it during the pre-online classifieds era, so I was forced to soldier on. Improvise, adapt, overcome.

When I finally broke down and bought the Korg DT-10 pedal tuner in 2007, it was a revelation. After eight years of having to shush my fellow musicians to be able to tune up, I could just plug in, hit the switch and tune away, even though a nuclear war might be going on around me. It was such a paradigm change that I could hardly wrap my head around it. The thing with a pedal tuner is that it not only takes up real estate on your pedalboard, it also consumes one DC power outlet and n amount of milliamps of your current budget. That’s why I found a clip-on such a welcome change of pace. Pedal tuners in all honor, but they fall kind of flat when introduced to something that is referred to as an acoustic guitar. A clip-on works with any guitar or even bass. I have reviewed two different flavors of clip-on tuner: the do-too-much Joyo and the just-about-perfect Korg Pitchclip. However, I have found that I am not too fond of them in live use. There is just too much vibration going on with the bass, rhythm guitar, drums and PA system, the little things get confused, on top of which you get a fair bit of user error, since I am usually in a hurry to get set up before the next song. Especially if I want to reset from drop-D to standard-E between two songs, which isn’t exactly rare.

I can’t remember exactly when TC Electronic introduced the Polytune, but it was between five and ten years ago. First, it felt a bit like black magic. Like, how the hell can a piece of software be able to show me the tuning of six strings at once? It turns out that I am considerably less impressed with it in actual use. I happened upon the clip-on version in our rehearsal room and borrowed it for a quick tune-up, out of plain curiosity. It agreed with the Korg all right. But the Poly mode did not agree with the single-string mode! Even my ears did not agree with the Poly mode, it was audibly out of tune. So much for “Strum. Tune. Rock.” I do realize that there could be user error here as well, but I would assume that such a system would be intuitive! Truth be told, I finally went ahead and bought myself a Polytune Clip, just last year. I got a good deal for one at my music store, and lots of people had expressed satisfaction with theirs, so I thought what the heck and got one for myself. If you press and hold one of the buttons for 5 seconds, it goes into Bass mode, which disables the Polytune function and only lets you tune one string at a time, and when I do that, it is actually a damn fine tuner! It just feels more accurate than my old Korg, more solid. I like the utility of it, but if I were to find myself on a stage again, I would definitely spend the cash and sacrifice a spot on my pedalboard for a small pedal tuner.

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Posted by on 26 November, 2017 in gear, review

 

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Editorial: The Pedalboard

In other news: my Pedaltrain 2 has arrived, along with my new Dunlop DVP-1 volume pedal. So, the pieces of my pedalboard are lying around. All that remains is to put it all together into a configuration. Other than the Pedaltrain and the power supply, the components are, in no particular order:

  • Korg DT-10 tuner
  • TC Electronic Spark Booster
  • MXR Phase 90 (block logo)
  • Dunlop Crybaby wah (limited edition white painted)
  • Dunlop DVP-1 volume pedal
  • TC Electronic Shaker Vibrato
  • MXR Carbon Copy analog delay

The vibrato and delay will go into the effects loop of the amp, the other five before the input. Cable cornucopia! The tuner will likely be connected to the tuner out of the volume pedal, unless I prefer the sound of its buffered input. More than that, I haven’t really figured out exactly in which order to put the pedals. The one thing I know is that I want to keep the phaser before the amp input, because I’ve yet to hear a phaser that sounds good after distortion. (Edit 16 March: accidentally wrote BEFORE distortion. Oops!) The vibrato does sound pretty cool before distortion, but the delay sure as hell doesn’t. Keep the regeneration and mix above 9 o’clock and it immediately turns to mush.

One thing that strikes me is that this pedalboard is not that different from what Hendrix would have used. That is entirely intentional. Listen back to those albums from 1967 and onwards, how the great players experimented with tones. Other than the really saturated modern metal tone, all the basic rock tones were already discovered before 1972. Before flangers, before choruses. In those days, there were Leslies, wahs and phasers, which are effects that simply feel more organic to me. Believe me, I have an incredible itch for a proper fuzz and a Uni-Vibe!

 
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Posted by on 15 March, 2014 in editorial, gear

 

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Review: Korg Pitchclip

The Joyo JT-12B demonstrated the basic validity of the clip-on tuner concept. But, as I pointed out in that review, that tuner is a little too versatile for its own good.

The Korg Pitchclip addresses all of those issues. This is the simplest device you could imagine. There is nothing to configure and consequently no wrong settings. It has one button, ON/OFF, and one pitch standard: 440 Hz. It shows two things: the note name and whether or not you’re in tune. The only feature available is that when you hold the on/off button down, the display is activated upside-down. This is actually more useful than I first imagined!

My only beef with the Pitchclip is that it only comes in funky neon colors. There is no black, so I selected the next best thing: a dark blue. But, as the guy told me when he sold it to me, at least no one is going to steal that pink Pitchclip from you!

On the whole, a simple but purposeful product that is wholeheartedly recommended!

 
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Posted by on 20 April, 2013 in gear, review

 

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